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Stories from diaspora// Dumitrița Gore – a violinist who performs on the best stages of Europe

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Dumitrița is a violinist who is in love with classical music and violin. People usually say about such talents: “She was meant to play music.” Arduous and passionate, romantic and beautiful, she always radiates on stage. Dumitrița is really young but already managed to have a lot of achievements and so much is yet to come…

About the way it started

Dumitrița loved music since her childhood. “In my family no one is a musician, but we sing a lot, especially when we get together for holidays.” When she was 7 years old, her mom brought her at the Music Lyceum “Ciprian Porumbescu” in Chișinău. Dumitrița says that at that moment she didn’t know what instrument she wanted to play. “I think the choice was, in fact, more of my mother. At that age I did not realize what instrument I would like to play. I liked music, I had a musical hearing and my mother decided I should try, and that’s how it all started,” recalls Dumitrița.

It didn’t take too much time for her to understand that this is what she would love to do her entire life. Every day, Dumitrița fell in love more and more with classical music. “Ever since I started learning at the Music Lyceum “Ciprian Porumbescu”, I did not think I could do something else besides music.”  The help and inspiration she got from her teachers, the passion about music, and the motivation from her successes at the national and international competitions convinced Dumitrița to continue playing violin.

“Since I was 14, I started playing in youth orchestras where I had the opportunity to meet a lot of people from different corners of the world.” Our protagonist made her solo debut at the age of 16 with the Moldovan National Chamber Orchestra and participated in more than 15 national and international competitions. Among the most important awards she won were the 1st Prize at the “Nedyalka Semionova” International Violin Competition (Bulgaria), the 1st Prize at the National Competition “Paul Constantinescu” (Romania) and the 2nd Prize at the International Competition “Eugen Coca” (R. of Moldova). “Every prize carries a distinct significance for me because each of them is about a lot of work and shivering. The first contest I participated in – the “Eugen Coca” International Competition, was special though, as it was in the 4th grade and was the one that made me spread my wings,” specifies Dumitrița.

About her experience abroad

Dumitrița understood that she would like to continue her studies abroad while she was still studying in Moldova. “I realized that it would open more doors and help me to progress more.” Later, she decided to apply to the University of Music and performing Arts in Mannheim, where she is currently studying. “Here in Germany, the attitude towards music differs greatly from that in Moldova. Classical music is loved, studies are made at a top-level and the competition is very high. That makes me think I have chosen well” she states.

Dumitrița managed to perform in such orchestras as the German Kurpfälzisches Kammerorchester, Youth Orchestra Romania-Moldova, Moldovan Youth Orchestra, Romanian Youth Orchestra, Romanian Symphony Orchestra, etc. Recently, Dumitrița got the chance to be a violinist in one of the best European youth orchestras – Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra. Moreover, for more than two years, she has been playing a Charles Adolphe Gand violin, dated 1855.

“In fact, I play in many more orchestras, as a member or a substitute. One can’t be a permanent member in the youth orchestras. Usually, they organize projects and tours for several weeks, to which I am invited. Sometimes, there are auditions, like in the case of  Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra. It is not something stable or systematical, as a job. That enables me to play in several orchestras, as well as to play more chamber music, which I really like and that inspires me a lot.”

As time went by, she gathered experience and a lot of wonderful memories. “I remember that at the last concert in the spring tour with the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra in Musikverein, Vienna, during the third symphony by Gustav Mahler, you could see tears in the eyes of both audiences and those on stage. It was a magical and a very emotional moment,” reveals Dumitrița.

About her little secrets

Dumitrița plays in many orchestras, studies at university and even makes some time for other hobbies she has – travelling and photography. “I’m lucky that the profession I chose gives me the possibility to travel quite often. I have projects in different locations of the world, but I get a special satisfaction when I have the opportunity to spend a few days of vacation and to recharge my batteries. For some time now, I’ve discovered my passion for photography, and that’s what I do more and more often,” she says.

Our protagonist says that there is no secret of succeeding to do so many things at the same time. “What helps me, in general, is that I am an ambitious person, and I do not give up easily. I have established my priorities and I try to not give too much meaning to the disappointing moments.”

Dumitrița still feels a connection with her homeland due to the fact that she has her family in Moldova and she also often craves for the Moldovan traditional food, as she says.

There is one more thing that is not widely known about Dumitrița: the violin she plays – the Charles Adolphe Gand violin, is a real treasure, literally, as it was estimated as having a value of about $75 000“I am playing this violin on generous loan from Prof. Gottfried Schatz. It is a special instrument with very strong and very warm sound at the same time. Only after I started playing this violin, I understood how much a really good instrument can help you. It’s a whole new feeling. The pleasure of creating music grows enormously when playing such an instrument. Still, it’s also an enormous responsibility, so I always do my best to keep it safe, take care of it and when I travel, I never let it out of my sight,” Dumitrița reveals.

Photos: Facebook/Dumitriţa Gore

Opinion

Survey// Popular COVID-19 fake news in Moldova and people’s (dis)information sources

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More and more Moldovans have to deal with fake news every day. Unfortunately, a part of population believes them. According to a survey conducted by the WatchDog.MD community, in cooperation with CBS Research, the degree of acceptance of various false statements indicates an extremely high level of trust in such manipulations among Moldovan citizens.

For example, when asked about quite a few popular fake statements that circulate the whole world regarding the novel coronavirus, the survey participants answered the following:

  • 50.4% of respondents believe that the virus is no more dangerous than a flu and that it was intentionally made to destroy the economy;
  • 37.8% of respondents admitted that the virus was created by Bill Gates, in order to introduce nano-chips in the bodies and control them;
  • 37,2% of questioned people think that the COVID-19 virus was created in a Chinese laboratory;
  • 35,9% of them said the pandemic is an excuse to impose a global Government that will rule the whole world;
  • 33,4% of participants consider garlic a remedy for coronavirus;
  • 32.7% of persons who answered the survey dangerously consider that the virus is a myth and everything is just a lie;
  • 32,3% of them are sure that only old people get infected and die;
  • 32,2% of survey participants believe that democratic regimes have bigger troubles with managing the crisis than the dictatorial ones;
  • 29.7% of persons said the EU will collapse due to the novel virus;
  • 28.8% of respondents fear the COVID-19 tests are already infected when getting tested.

And these are, by far, not all false statements some Moldovans declared as being true during the survey. Some respondents think that the virus is spread in the Republic of Moldova through the 5G technology (11.7%), even though there is no such technology used in the country yet. Others claimed that the European Union didn’t offer any support to Moldova during the pandemic crisis (21.3%), despite the existing facts they can easily check.

Out of 1003 respondents, only one denied absolutely all false or manipulating statements.

At the same time, 45% of the Moldovan citizens who answered the opinion poll don’t trust at all or trust very little the World Health Organisation as a source of information. 5.2% of them don’t even know anything about the organisation.

When it comes to the local information sources, the survey respondents claimed that they merely find out what’s new by watching TV (77.2%), by accessing web pages (42.2%), various social media platforms (35.7%), such as Facebook, Odnoklasniki, Instagram and Vkontakte, or talk to family members (12.7%), friends and neighbours (15.1%).

Another important aspect is that only 1.4% of respondents inform themselves in any other language than Romanian, Russian or both. Even so, 16.3% of survey participants said it is rather hard or very hard for them to understand what news are accurate and whether the information presented is true or not.

A crucial source of disinformation for people of Moldova, which is not mentioned in the options of the survey though, is the church. Lately, the Moldovan Orthodox Church spread dangerous fakes about COVID-19 vaccination, nano-chipping and 5G.

See also: The Moldovan Orthodox Church spread dangerous fakes about COVID-19 vaccination, nano-chipping and 5G

**

The survey was conducted at the national level between May 5-11, being part of the project “Facilitating crisis communication and accountability as a civic response to COVID-19 pandemic in Moldova”. It was implemented with the support of the Black Sea Trust for Regional Cooperation of the German Marshall Fund and involved 1003 persons aged 18 years and over.

The study measured political trends, geo-political preferences, media consumption, as well as the impact of manipulative rhetoric, false news and conspiracy theories in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Photo: Lukas Blazek| Unsplash

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Economy

3 UN agencies will receive 1 million dollars for supporting the most vulnerable COVID-19 patients from Moldova

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Three United Nations (UN) agencies from Moldova – UNICEF, UN Women and the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) will receive one million dollars from the UN COVID-19 Response and Recovery Multi-Partner Trust Fund to support the country in its fight against COVID-19 pandemic, according to a press release of the UN in Moldova.

The agencies are involved in a programme lasting for 6 months and aiming to ensure effective and accessible health services for COVID-19 patients in Moldova, with a focus on vulnerable and disadvantaged persons. 

Mainly, the funds will be used for purchase of personal protective equipment for health and non-health institutions, such as hospitals, police, border police, penitentiaries, social assistance centres and others “in order to ensure efficient and safe provision of public services during the COVID-19 crisis.”

Additionally, such supplies as sanitisers, protective supplies, food packages (for at least two months), soap, etc. will be transmitted to the most vulnerable groups of women from Moldova, including women affected by violence, women living in shelters, HIV and AIDS positive women, disabled women, and Romani women.

According to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Social Protection data, out of the total of 7147 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Moldova, 59% are represented by women. Most infected women are between 40 and 69 years old. 67 infected women are pregnant.

Photo: UN Moldova

“The global epidemic of COVID-19 poses a clear risk to the health and well-being of the Republic of Moldova. Within this project, the control and management of the infection at the border control points of the country will be strengthened by updating and disseminating of international standards-compliant operating procedures for detection, notification, isolation, management and referral of travellers potentially infected with coronavirus, delivering necessary training for the border police officers, providing necessary supplies to screen the incoming citizens to prevent the spread of the disease,” is mentioned in the press release.

The United Nations in Moldova has been supporting the Government of Moldova and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Social Protection in three main areas: health system preparedness, technical support and capacity building, and risk information and communication on COVID-19 under the guidance of WHO Moldova.

The United Nations (UN) COVID-19 Response and Recovery Multi-Partner Trust Fund is a UN inter-agency finance mechanism launched by the UN Secretary-General to support low- and middle- income programme countries in overcoming the health and development crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Fund’s assistance targets those most vulnerable to economic hardship and social disruption.

The fund is currently supported by the Governments of Norway, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

Photo: Iran Press

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Culture

Generation C – a documentary by Moldova.org about shepherding in Moldova and Georgia // VIDEO

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At the end of January, Moldova.org presented the premiere of the documentary Generation C, a film about an occupation that was passed on from father to son – shepherding.

The documentary tells the story of Vaso and Anatolie – two men, one from the Georgian mountains and another from the south of Moldova – and displays the activity of their lives, that of their fathers, grandparents and great-grandparents. But will it be inherited by their sons as well?

Anatolie Ciobanu (his name is translated as shepherd) lives in Alexandru Ioan Cuza village, Cahul district. He has several hundred sheep and says he may run out of them one day.

Vaso Gulelauri lives in Lalisquri Village, Telavi, Georgia with his family. When he is not taking care of sheep and is not at home, he spends his time in the mountains. He has never been to the sea, because he loves the mountains too much.

In the last 20 years, the number of sheep in the Republic of Moldova has almost halved. The same thing happened in Georgia. Before the collapse of the Soviet Union, Georgia had about two million sheep. Now, the figure reaches one million only.

The documentary can be watched below:

„Generation C” documentary (english subtitles)

Prieteni, astăzi publicăm documentarul „Generația C” subtitrat în limba engleză! Deci vă invităm să-l distribuiți și să-l arătați prietenilor voștri care nu vorbesc româna sau georgiana și rusa. ^_^Într-o eră a Internetului, vitezei și industrializării, doi ciobani, unul moldovean, altul georgian, ne-au împărtășit istoriile lor și ne-au vorbit despre tradiția transmisă lor de bunicii și tații lor.Pe lângă imaginile pitorești, bucuria celor doi este că încă mai pot împărtăși această cutumă cu fii lor. Dar oare vor fi cei doi oieri și ultima generație de ciobani din familiile lor? Găsiți răspunsul în documentarul nostru, „Generația C”.

Geplaatst door Moldova.org op Maandag 18 mei 2020

This text is a translation. The original article here.

Photos: Moldova.org| Tatiana Beghiu

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